14 March 2009

03/14/09 Last Week in Literary News

New York Times Bestseller List

The following books are listed in the carousel above for your convenience.


  1. HANDLE WITH CARE, by Jodi Picoult
  2. THE ASSOCIATE, by John Grisham
  3. PROMISES IN DEATH, by J. D. Robb
  4. RUN FOR YOUR LIFE, by James Patterson and Michael Ledwidge
  5. ONE DAY AT A TIME, by Danielle Steel


  1. OUTLIERS, by Malcolm Gladwell
  2. THE YANKEE YEARS, by Joe Torre and Tom Verducci
  3. OUT OF CAPTIVITY, by Marc Gonsalves, Keith Stansell, Tom Howes and Gary Brozek
  4. THE LOST CITY OF Z, by David Grann
  5. DEWEY, by Vicki Myron with Bret Witter

Literary News

Previously Unpublished Mark Twain Story Hits Newsstands
By Ginny Wiehardt, About.com Guide to Fiction Writing, Wednesday March 11, 2009

Mark Twain fans will be interested to hear that a never-before-seen Twain story, “The Undertaker’s Tale," long buried within an enormous body of unpublished stories, letters, and essays, appeared this week in the pages of mystery magazine The Strand.

Part of a forthcoming collection of previously unpublished stories and essays, Who Is Mark Twain? (HarperStudio), the story features Twain's characteristic razor sharp wit in a tongue-in-cheek tale about the funeral industry. Read More

Release date scheduled for Ted Kennedy's memoir
By HILLEL ITALIE, AP National Writer Hillel Italie, Ap National Writer Wed Mar 11, 6:56 pm ET

In this May 20, 2008 file photo, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., smiles as he NEW YORK – The editor of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's memoir says the book will come out this fall.

Jonathan Karp of the Twelve imprint at the Hachette Book Group USA, announced the release Wednesday during the annual meeting of the Association of American Publishers. Twelve spokesman Cary Goldstein said the book, titled "True Compass," would be listed in the publisher's fall catalog, out next month.

Harvard president wins $50,000 book prize
AP, Tue Mar 10, 2:57 pm ET

In this May 19, 2008 file photo, Harvard University President Drew Gilpin FaustNEW YORK – Historian and Harvard University president Drew Gilpin Faust has won a $50,000 prize from the New York Historical Society for "This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War."

Faust, 61, received the fourth annual American History Book Prize, the society announced Tuesday. She has written several other books about the Civil War and the South, including "Mothers of Invention" and "A Sacred Circle."

Previous winners include Doris Kearns Goodwin and David Nasaw.

Novelist Clive Cussler hit with hefty legal bill
By Eriq Gardner Eriq Gardner Tue Mar 10, 11:27 pm ET

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) – Here's a shot across the bow of anyone who licenses the rights to a film and considers suing when things don't go as planned:

A Los Angeles Superior Court has ordered best-selling novelist Clive Cussler to pay $14 million in legal fees to Crusader Entertainment after litigating an unsuccessful lawsuit.

The case earned extraordinary attention a few years ago thanks to the mammoth box office flop of "Sahara," a 2005 film version of Cussler's novel that starred Matthew McConaughey and Penelope Cruz and is estimated to have lost about $80 million.

Newspaper publisher McClatchy cutting 1,600 jobs
By MICHAEL LIEDTKE, AP Business Writer Michael Liedtke, Ap Business Writer Mon Mar 9, 5:16 pm ET

SAN FRANCISCO – McClatchy Co. is shearing another 1,600 jobs in a cost-cutting spree that has clipped nearly one-third of the newspaper publisher's work force in less than a year.


11 March 2009

Writing Prompt - Natural Disaster

Every place has a type of natural disaster that is common for the area. For your area, it may be wild fires, volcanoes, earthquakes, or hurricanes. Here in Ohio, it is tornados, and tornado season is arriving.

by rachel_r's photostream

This week's writing prompt was inspired by a friend who spent Saturday listening to the tornado alarm sound all day when there was not a threat of a tornado.

Think about a type of natural disaster common in  your area and the early warning systems that are in place.

You are having a family get together - maybe a dinner or a birthday celebration - when the alarm sounds. What are the different reactions of your family members. How do the children react? Are they scared or do they calming start doing what they are supposed to do? How do the older people react? Are they jaded from too many false alarms or have they seen enough to know to take them serious? Is anyone likely to step outside to look? How do you react? I know in my family, there is someone for each of these reactions.

Include if there is or is not a real threat, what happens? Do people's demeanor change? Is the person in charge suddenly a quivering mess? Does the whole family pull together?

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